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Cricket fan tracks down Bairstow to gift him gloves signed by dead father

Photo of the Jonny Bairstow's dad's gloves
Related Story: Alleged clash with Bancroft just players 'having a laugh', Bairstow says

Thirty-nine years ago, a young boy called Andrew Johns won a pair of kids' wicketkeeping gloves signed by England's David Bairstow.

On day three at Adelaide Oval, Mr Johns was lucky enough to catch up with Bairstow's son, Jonny, and gifted him his precious keepsake in a moment that lit up the England man's Test.

Speaking to Grandstand, Mr Johns told of the lucky circumstances that led to their meeting.

"I've had them for 39 years … my mum and dad took me to West Lakes shopping centre [in Adelaide] and the English cricket team were there to meet," he said.

"They had a little quiz — they asked who the reserve wicketkeeper was for England and I shot my hand up, and said...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Cricket fan tracks down Bairstow to gift him gloves signed by dead father

Flyin' Lyon, the man whose feet don't touch the ground

Nathan Lyon dives in the air to his left to take a one-handed catch off his own bowling to dismiss Moeen Ali.

When Nathan Lyon left the Adelaide earth, I already knew he was going to catch it.

That might sound silly. Manifest destiny. Hindsight genius. It's probably wrong for every reason you can point to.

But sometimes you feel like you know. You watch a fieldsman circle under a high ball, and can tell when confidence has leached from their limbs.

Like Steve O'Keefe on the Revolver dancefloor, you're just waiting for the drop.

This time around, Moeen Ali checked a drive towards mid-on. He hit it solidly enough. The ball was going well wide of the bowler. A streaky single for sure.

Except at the same time the bowler was in movement, a streak of white like an albatross hitting the South Atlantic. Not a downward dive though, horizontal.

While he was diving and the ball was flying, still so...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Flyin' Lyon, the man whose feet don't touch the ground

Flyin' Lyon, the man whose feet don't touch the ground

Nathan Lyon dives in the air to his left to take a one-handed catch off his own bowling to dismiss Moeen Ali.

When Nathan Lyon left the Adelaide earth, I already knew he was going to catch it.

That might sound silly. Manifest destiny. Hindsight genius. It's probably wrong for every reason you can point to.

But sometimes you feel like you know. You watch a fieldsman circle under a high ball, and can tell when confidence has leached from their limbs.

Like Steve O'Keefe on the Revolver dancefloor, you're just waiting for the drop.

This time around, Moeen Ali checked a drive towards mid-on. He hit it solidly enough. The ball was going well wide of the bowler. A streaky single for sure.

Except at the same time the bowler was in movement, a streak of white like an albatross hitting the South Atlantic. Not a downward dive though, horizontal.

While he was diving and the ball was flying, still so...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Flyin' Lyon, the man whose feet don't touch the ground

The WACA is losing its biggest matches, and cricket chiefs couldn't be happier

A sun rises into a grey sky over two light towers at the WACA Ground in Perth.

Cricket's governing body in Western Australia is adamant it will be financially better off when the WACA Ground loses the biggest Test matches and other blockbuster fixtures to the new 60,000-seat Perth Stadium.

The Western Australian Cricket Association (WACA) is confident it will thrive under the dual-stadium model, and believes its plans to redevelop the WACA Ground into a boutique 15,000-seat venue are viable in the long term.

That is despite its $150 million redevelopment plan including a request for $50 million from the cash-strapped McGowan Government — an amount described by Sports Minister Mick Murray as "a lot of money".

The third Ashes Test — which gets under way on December 14 — will be the last one played at the WACA Ground.

After that, Test and one-day international...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: The WACA is losing its biggest matches, and cricket chiefs couldn't be happier

Flyin' Lyon, the man whose feet don't touch the ground

Nathan Lyon dives in the air to his left to take a one-handed catch off his own bowling to dismiss Moeen Ali.

When Nathan Lyon left the Adelaide earth, I already knew he was going to catch it.

That might sound silly. Manifest destiny. Hindsight genius. It's probably wrong for every reason you can point to.

But sometimes you feel like you know. You watch a fieldsman circle under a high ball, and can tell when confidence has leached from their limbs.

Like Steve O'Keefe on the Revolver dancefloor, you're just waiting for the drop.

This time around, Moeen Ali checked a drive towards mid-on. He hit it solidly enough. The ball was going well wide of the bowler. A streaky single for sure.

Except at the same time the bowler was in movement, a streak of white like an albatross hitting the South Atlantic. Not a downward dive though, horizontal.

While he was diving and the ball was flying, still so...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Flyin' Lyon, the man whose feet don't touch the ground

The WACA is losing its biggest matches, and cricket chiefs couldn't be happier

A sun rises into a grey sky over two light towers at the WACA Ground in Perth.

Cricket's governing body in Western Australia is adamant it will be financially better off when the WACA Ground loses the biggest Test matches and other blockbuster fixtures to the new 60,000-seat Perth Stadium.

The Western Australian Cricket Association (WACA) is confident it will thrive under the dual-stadium model, and believes its plans to redevelop the WACA Ground into a boutique 15,000-seat venue are viable in the long term.

That is despite its $150 million redevelopment plan including a request for $50 million from the cash-strapped McGowan Government — an amount described by Sports Minister Mick Murray as "a lot of money".

The third Ashes Test — which gets under way on December 14 — will be the last one played at the WACA Ground.

After that, Test and one-day international...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: The WACA is losing its biggest matches, and cricket chiefs couldn't be happier

The WACA is losing its biggest matches, and cricket chiefs couldn't be happier

A sun rises into a grey sky over two light towers at the WACA Ground in Perth.

Cricket's governing body in Western Australia is adamant it will be financially better off when the WACA Ground loses the biggest Test matches and other blockbuster fixtures to the new 60,000-seat Perth Stadium.

The Western Australian Cricket Association (WACA) is confident it will thrive under the dual-stadium model, and believes its plans to redevelop the WACA Ground into a boutique 15,000-seat venue are viable in the long term.

That is despite its $150 million redevelopment plan including a request for $50 million from the cash-strapped McGowan Government — an amount described by Sports Minister Mick Murray as "a lot of money".

The third Ashes Test — which gets under way on December 14 — will be the last one played at the WACA Ground.

After that, Test and one-day international...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: The WACA is losing its biggest matches, and cricket chiefs couldn't be happier

Smith's follow-on decision raises eyebrows as Australians stumble under lights

Steve Smith out
Related Story: Superb bowling and brilliant catching put Australia in box seat in Adelaide
Related Story: As it happened: Australian top order collapses but hosts on top

Steve Smith could regret deciding not to enforce the follow-on after England ripped through Australia's top order in Adelaide.

The Australian skipper followed a growing trend in Test cricket when he opted against sending England in to bat again on day three of the pink-ball Ashes Test.

England were bowled out for 227, trailing Australia by 215 runs, with more than 90 minutes left in Monday's evening session.

Smith opted to rest his bowlers rather than give them a second bite of the cherry under the Adelaide Oval lights, where the pink ball has tended to be at its liveliest.

...

Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Smith's follow-on decision raises eyebrows as Australians stumble under lights

Smith's follow-on decision raises eyebrows as Australians stumble under lights

Steve Smith out
Related Story: Superb bowling and brilliant catching put Australia in box seat in Adelaide
Related Story: As it happened: Australian top order collapses but hosts on top

Steve Smith could regret deciding not to enforce the follow-on after England ripped through Australia's top order in Adelaide.

The Australian skipper followed a growing trend in Test cricket when he opted against sending England in to bat again on day three of the pink-ball Ashes Test.

England were bowled out for 227, trailing Australia by 215 runs, with more than 90 minutes left in Monday's evening session.

Smith opted to rest his bowlers rather than give them a second bite of the cherry under the Adelaide Oval lights, where the pink ball has tended to be at its liveliest.

...

Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Smith's follow-on decision raises eyebrows as Australians stumble under lights

Sledging, banter or abuse? Australia's on-field talk is just part of the game

Steve Smith plays a shot for Australia on day two at the Gabba
Related Story: We made a huge mistake: cricket fans say sorry to Ashes hero Shaun Marsh
Related Story: Superb bowling and brilliant catching put Australia in box seat in Adelaide

If one accepted the tenor of some coverage of the opening salvoes of the current Ashes series, in Brisbane and Adelaide, one could conclude that Australia may finally be about to become a republic and sever ties with England.

The hysteria of some tabloid coverage implies that relations between the Australian and English teams are at their lowest since the Bodyline controversy of 1932-33, which did lead to a terse exchange of messages between the cricket authorities of both nations.

Given that Australia had yet to even ratify the Statute of Westminster and we...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Sledging, banter or abuse? Australia's on-field talk is just part of the game

Sledging, banter or abuse? Australia's on-field talk is just part of the game

Steve Smith plays a shot for Australia on day two at the Gabba
Related Story: We made a huge mistake: cricket fans say sorry to Ashes hero Shaun Marsh
Related Story: Superb bowling and brilliant catching put Australia in box seat in Adelaide

If one accepted the tenor of some coverage of the opening salvoes of the current Ashes series, in Brisbane and Adelaide, one could conclude that Australia may finally be about to become a republic and sever ties with England.

The hysteria of some tabloid coverage implies that relations between the Australian and English teams are at their lowest since the Bodyline controversy of 1932-33, which did lead to a terse exchange of messages between the cricket authorities of both nations.

Given that Australia had yet to even ratify the Statute of Westminster and we...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Sledging, banter or abuse? Australia's on-field talk is just part of the game

The match-ups that will decide ODI series

PAKISTAN is desperate to end their tour Down Under on a bright note when they take on Australia in a five-match ODI series, beginning in Brisbane on Friday.

And of the 22 men to line up at the Gabba in the first rubber, there’s a handful who could decide the result off their own bat (or ball).

These are the head-to-head player match-ups that will define the ODI series.

Check out our ultimate guide to the Australia v Pakistan ODI series for everything you need to know!

DAVID WARNER v BABAR AZAM


Read full article on Sports NewsComAu Cricket


Read more: The match-ups that will decide ODI series

Resist the urge: Katich’s memo to Test selectors

FORMER Australian batsman Simon Katich doesn’t know who will take the gloves for Australia in India, but has advised against the selectors taking a punt on Peter Handscomb.

The 25-year-old filled in briefly for an ill wicketkeeper Matthew Wade in Sydney and has since assumed responsibilities behind the pegs for the Melbourne Stars.

But Katich, who was part of Australia’s historic and drought-breaking series win in India back in 2004, says forcing Handscomb to keep largely against his will should not be on the selectors’ radar when they meet on Thursday.

“If he wanted to keep for Australia, he’d be keeping at domestic level in Shield cricket,” Katich told Foxsports.com.au.

“Obviously there is that clash when he is there with Matthew Wade. It seems like he’s content with being a Test batsman.


Read full article on Sports NewsComAu Cricket


Read more: Resist the urge: Katich’s memo to Test selectors

Fan's touching gesture for Bairstow - cricket.com.au

A "fantastic gesture" from an Australian cricket fan in Adelaide has seen England wicketkeeper Jonny Bairstow handed a special piece of family memorabilia ahead of the third day of the second Magellan Ashes Test.

On Monday morning, Bairstow was given a pair of wicketkeeping gloves that had been signed by his late father, the former England keeper David Bairstow, on England's 1978-79 tour of Australia.

Bairstow Snr, who played four Tests and 21 one-day internationals for England between 1979-1984, took his own life in 1998 when Jonny was just eight years old.

Adelaide man Andrew Johns was given the gloves when he was a child and with the return of Bairstow Jnr to his home city, Johns was keen to reunite the Yorkshireman with the souvenir bearing his father's name.

"A chap called Andrew messaged me on Instagram, actually," Bairstow told ABC Grandstand ahead of play on day three. "I...


Read full article on Sports GN Cricket


Read more: Fan's touching gesture for Bairstow - cricket.com.au

Aussie cricket options running deep again - SBS

Just a fortnight after wondering who to pick, Australian selectors have a depth of talent to choose.

A fortnight ago, Australian selectors were looking at the bottom of the barrel.

Now, it's overflowing with options.

Glenn Maxwell, Travis Head and Alex Carey have all found their timing in a cricket sense.

But surely the trio are lamenting the timing of that timing.

All were touted as prospects for the Test series against England.

All would have heard the selectors' pre-Ashes messages loud and clear: make Sheffield Shield runs and you're in.

But a month ago, Victoria's Maxwell and South Australian duo Head and Carey couldn't produce the weight of Sheffield Shield runs to demand Test selection.

Yet since Australian selectors took a punt on Shaun Marsh, Tim Paine and Cameron Bancfroft, the tide has turned for the trio of could-have beens.

Since the naming of the Ashes side, Maxwell, who...


Read full article on Sports GN Cricket


Read more: Aussie cricket options running deep again - SBS

Versatile Marsh achieves rare feat - cricket.com.au

Shaun Marsh's fifth Test century on Sunday not only put his side in a dominant position in Adelaide, it underlined his status as one of the most versatile Test batsmen Australia has ever produced.

In reaching three figures batting at No.6, Marsh joined former Test skipper Lindsay Hassett as the only Australians to have scored a Test century from every position in the top six - opener, No.3, No.4, No.5, and No.6.

It's a rare feat, but one that's not unheard of internationally; the likes of Indian greats Rahul Dravid and VVS Laxman completed the full set in their careers, as did West Indian legends Viv Richards and Garry Sobers, with Sobers scoring a ton at No.7 as well.

Marsh silences critics with super 126no

But while Greg Chappell and Don Bradman, for example, scored centuries in every position from No.3 to No.7, and early 20th century allrounder Warwick Armstrong did so as an...


Read full article on Sports GN Cricket


Read more: Versatile Marsh achieves rare feat - cricket.com.au

England have failed to impress: Ponting | cricket.com.au - cricket.com.au

Test great Ricky Ponting made a bold prediction of a 4-0 Australian triumph before a ball of this summer's Magellan Ashes had been bowled, and the former skipper insists nothing from England across seven days of the series to date has persuaded him to change his mind.

A 10-wicket thrashing in Brisbane has been backed up by two difficult days for the tourists in Adelaide, leaving Joe Root's team staring down the barrel of a 2-0 series scoreline, with some even suggesting a third whitewash in their past four Ashes tours could then become a real possibility.

Having had the best of the conditions to start each Test match, England's pace attack has been found out by a ruthless Australian outfit and Ponting says it's a long way back for the visitors.

"England haven't done anything to impress me yet," Ponting told cricket.com.au.

"Everyone talked about how even the first Test...


Read full article on Sports GN Cricket


Read more: England have failed to impress: Ponting | cricket.com.au - cricket.com.au

The Ashes: England's preparation no match for Australia's secret weapon - playing cricket - The Sydney Morning Herald

While England arrived in Adelaide for the second Test match with ideas, speculations, anxieties and contingencies, Australia came with a secret weapon.

England equipped themselves with detailed plans about their use of the pink ball, informed by scientific analysis of playing conditions under sun and moon, daylight and twilight. They bore notions of persecution and counter-measures in the arts of psychological warfare, with complaints not just lined up but their release timetabled for maximum effect. There were Ben Stokes's travel arrangements and other shenanigans to finesse, or to find out about by surprise. So much to think about. They had everything schemed in advance, so much so that Joe Root, before he chose to touch the first new ball on Saturday, was already talking about the advantages of the second.

What a catch: Off his own bowling, Nathan Lyon flies through the air to snare Moeen Ali. What a catch: Off his own bowling, Nathan Lyon flies through the air to...

Read full article on Sports GN Cricket


Read more: The Ashes: England's preparation no match for Australia's secret weapon - playing cricket - The...

England confirm Alex Hales is available for selection after being exonerated - Fox Sports

ENGLAND batsman Alex Hales has been cleared to play again after being exonerated of wrongdoing in a street fight, which also involved Ben Stokes.

Hales and Stokes had been suspended by England’s cricket board after the brawl in Bristol in late September.

English prosecutors have told the ECB that Hales is no longer a police suspect. But whether Stokes will face criminal charges remains unknown. Hales is set to be included in England’s one-day squad for a five-match series against Australia starting January 14.

UK media is also reporting that Stokes could be provisionally be named in the squad, which is expected to be announced later this week.

  1. Team logo for Pakistan

    Sheikh Zayed Stadium

    SRI won by 21 runs

    Team logo for Sri Lanka

    Visit Match Centre

  2. Team logo for South Africa

    3/496d &

    6/247d

    Senwes Park

    RSA won by 333 runs

    Team logo for Bangladesh

    Visit Match Centre

  3. Team logo for South Africa

    Mangaung...


Read full article on Sports GN Cricket


Read more: England confirm Alex Hales is available for selection after being exonerated - Fox Sports

Cricket fan tracks down Bairstow to gift him gloves signed by dead father

Photo of the Jonny Bairstow's dad's gloves
Related Story: Alleged clash with Bancroft just players 'having a laugh', Bairstow says

Thirty-nine years ago, a young boy called Andrew Johns won a pair of kids' wicketkeeping gloves signed by England's David Bairstow.

On day three at Adelaide Oval, Mr Johns was lucky enough to catch up with Bairstow's son, Jonny, and gifted him his precious keepsake in a moment that lit up the England man's Test.

Speaking to Grandstand, Mr Johns told of the lucky circumstances that led to their meeting.

"I've had them for 39 years … my mum and dad took me to West Lakes shopping centre [in Adelaide] and the English cricket team were there to meet," he said.

"They had a little quiz — they asked who the reserve wicketkeeper was for England and I shot my hand up,...


Read full article on Sports ABC Cricket


Read more: Cricket fan tracks down Bairstow to gift him gloves signed by dead father

 

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